HISTORICAL MUSEUM

The Educational and Cultural Council of the Assembly of the Socialist Republic of Montenegro adopted in 1967 a recommendation on the solution of the current issues of museum development in SR Montenegro, where the need for scientific elaboration of the concept of the Historical Museum was pointed out. The decision on the formation of the Council for the preparation of the permanent exhibition of the Historical Museum was made in 1980.

Under the Statute of the National Museum of Montenegro of 2012, the Historical Museum, in addition to its permanent exhibition, came to incorporate: Njegoš’s Museum (The Biljarda and Njegoš’s Birthplace in Njeguši), King Nikola’s Museum, Bishop Danilo’s Mausoleum on Orlov Krš, the Mausoleum of Petar II Petrović Njegoš on Mount Lovćen and the Mausoleum of Montenegrin Rulers – Court Church at Ćipur.

Opening times:
Peak season: 09:00 – 17:00h
Low season: 09:00 – 16:00h (closed on Sundays)

Admission:
Adults: 3,00€
Schoolchildren/Students: 1,5€

From the oldest recorded remains of human activity to modern times, the permanent exhibition of the Historical Museum, in a timeline, takes the visitor through the history of this area. Mounted for the first time in 1989, the exhibition was modernized in 2011, when the museum items about the period prior to the Austro-Hungarian occupation of Montenegro in 1916 were put on display. An exhibition area devoted to the period from the First World War to the year 2007, ending with the adoption of the Constitution of the internationally recognized independent state, was opened on 20th May 2016, on the occasion of the 10th anniversary of Montenegro’s restoration of independence.

KING NIKOLA’S MUSEUM

Opening times:
Peak season: 09:00 – 17:00h
Low season: 09:00 – 16:00h (closed on Sundays)

Admission:
Adults: 5,00€
Schoolchildren/Students: 2,5€

King Nikola’s Museum was founded in 1926 in the palace of the royal family, Petrović Njegoš. The construction of the edifice commenced in 1863 to be completed in 1867. It is interesting to note that the building was originally built as a home for Prince Danilo’s widow Darinka and their daughter Olga. Upon Darinka’s departure from Montenegro, the ruling Petrović-Njegoš family moved from the Biljarda to this palace. The royal residence has undergone a number of major reconstructions, with the latest modifications made in 1910, when the building gained its present appearance.

 

King Nikola’s Museum brought together the holdings of the Military Museum and the National Museum, institutions founded in the 19th century, as well as the entire preserved collection of items from the Montenegrin royal residences. Thus, its collection now comprises the material of major significance for the Montenegrin political, military and cultural history which continually leads us through the process of establishing Montenegrin statehood, from the mediaeval beginnings to the year 1918.

The permanent exhibition of the museum is conceived of as the reconstructed interior of the royal palace, displaying a wide array of objects related to the Petrović Njegoš dynasty. The rich royal library also contains copies of books produced by the Crnojević printing house.

King Nikola’s Museum is the most attractive museum for tourists boasting the largest number of visitors every year.

NJEGOŠ’S MUSEUM

Opening times:
Peak season: 09:00 – 17:00h
Low season: 09:00 – 16:00h (closed on Sundays)

Admission:
Adults: 3,00€
Schoolchildren/Students: 1,5€

Njegoš’s Museum – the Biljarda was founded in 1951 in the former residence of the Montenegrin ruler Petar II Petrović Njegoš, which was built in 1838. When the Cetinje Monastery became insufficient to accommodate all state institutions, Njegoš erected a new building in its immediate vicinity. The Biljarda was given its unusual name after billiards, Njegoš’s favourite game.

The permanent exhibition of this museum is dedicated to Njegoš’s life and creative work and contains his personal belongings, works of art, as well as his library and manuscripts, the most prominent of which is the original manuscript of Gorski vijenac (The Mountain Wreath). The museum also includes a space adapted for temporary exhibitions.

 

In the courtyard of the Biljarda lies a relief map of Montenegro at a scale of 1:10,000, created in 1917 during the period of the Austro-Hungarian occupation of Montenegro. As a historical object, the relief map has a significant cultural and artistic value and represents a successful cartographic work. Among other things, the map features parts of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Albania and Serbia. It is made of concrete on a stone surface on the basis of Austrian precise topographic maps and is a unique cultural monument of this kind.

THE MAUSOLEUM OF PETAR II PETROVIĆ NJEGOŠ ON MOUNT LOVĆEN

Opening times:
Peak season: TBA
Low season: closed

Admission:
Adults: 3,00€
Schoolchildren/Students: 1,5€

On the 100th anniversary of Njegoš’s death in 1951, the Government of the People’s Republic of Montenegro made a decision to erect a Mausoleum on Mount Lovćen in honour of Petar II Petrović to replace the existing Chapel. This monumental edifice was constructed in 1974 according to the design of the great Yugoslav architect and sculptor Ivan Meštrović.

The Mausoleum was built at an altitude of 1,660 m and stretches along the entire peak called Jezerski vrh. It encompasses an access to a tunnel featuring 461 stairs, an open surface and the lobby of the Mausoleum, a path and a circle-like stone structure (guvno) as a vantage point.

NJEGOŠ’S BIRTHPLACE

Opening times:
Peak season: TBA
Low season: closed

Admission:
Adults: 2,00€
Schoolchildren/Students: 1,00€

The house in the hamlet of Erakovići in Njeguši, in which Njegoš was born in 1813, is a building the appearance and furnishings of which provide a picture of a more affluent Montenegrin house from the beginning of the 19th century. Njegoš’s Birthplace, built by Njegoš’s uncle Petar I Petrović in 1779, in 1973 was converted into a memorial museum dedicated to Njegoš. The museum displays ethnographic material and fine pieces of crafted weapons.

In the yard of Njegoš’s Birthplace, there is the house of Prince Nikola Petrović in which the last Montenegrin ruler from the Petrović dynasty was born. This two-storey building is one of the more solidly built houses in Njeguši Field. It was built by Prince Nikola’s father, Duke Mirko Petrović, in the first half of the 19th century.

BISHOP DANILO’S MAUSOLEUM ON ORLOV KRŠ

The Mausoleum of Bishop Danilo, the founder of the new Cetinje Monastery and the Petrović Njegoš dynasty, was erected on Orlov Krš. It was built in 1896, on the 200th anniversary of the Petrović dynasty rule. The idea for the project came from Prince Nikola’s daughter, Princess Jelena, who also drew the preliminary plan, which was used by the French architect Frouchet who worked on the project. The mausoleum was built of stone from Ljubović Hill under the supervision of the engineer Andrija Radović.

Bishop Danilo’s Mausoleum is a unique blend of landscape and architecture. Together with the surrounding park area, it represents one of the most beautiful vantage points.

MAUZOLEJ CRNOGORSKIH VLADARA – DVORSKA CRKVA NA ĆIPURU

On the ruins of the Crnojević Monastery, Prince Nikola erected a court church dedicated to the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary to serve for court ceremonies. The Court Church at Ćipur was declared cultural heritage in 1961 while in 2012 it became an integral part of the Historical Museum of Montenegro.

During the archaeological excavations at the Ćipur site, the foundations of the Crnojević Monastery complex were also found. The original columns and capitals discovered on the site were transferred and integrated into the permanent exhibition of the Historical Museum, while their replicas, put in their place, are on display at Ćipur itself.

In 1989, the posthumous remains of the Montenegrin King Nikola and his wife Queen Milena were transferred from the Russian church in San Remo to the Court Church at Ćipur in Cetinje.